Jefferson County Open School

The Jefferson County Open School is a public preK-12 school in Edgewood, Colorado, that embodies Meaningful Student Involvement.

About

All students focus on personal identity, social interaction and intellectual inquiry. This holistic curriculum is reflected in the twenty-four graduation expectations and the incorporation of personal goals in an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) which is carried out in mutually agreeable programs worked out between each student and advisor.

Curriculum

At this school, students of all ages interact and learn from each other. Self-direction is a fundamental principle, and every student is engaged in and in charge of their own learning. The Open School provides a dynamic environment that fosters the development of the unique potential in each individual by nurturing and challenging the whole person. There is an emphasis on self-direction, learning through experience, shared responsibility, and the development of life long-skills. Students experience a lot of out-of-school learning opportunities, with overnight camping trips for elementary students and trips for older students to travel the world.

Related Content

Elsewhere Online

Mississippi State Superintendent Advisory Committee

From 1998 through 2002, the Mississippi State Superintendent Advisory Committee included 23 students. With student advisors in grades 10 through 12 grades, they served two year terms.

Each year, the State Superintendent requested that each member of his Superintendent’s Advisory Committee, composed of 23 public school superintendents, selected a student member to serve on the State Superintendent’s Student Advisory Committee.

The group was informal and met periodically with the State Superintendent to discuss education issues in the state. The State Superintendent of Education voluntarily sought this student voice. There was no legislation in Mississippi mandating student input.

Students were eligible for appropriate state reimbursement.

The State Superintendent of Education requested diverse candidates, and efforts were made to include students who are not always presented with honors or awards.

Members included students from vocational organizations (FFA, FBLA, etc.), students with varying GPA’s, and students from varying gender and racial categories.

Related Content

Elsewhere Online

  • No additional information is available at this time. Please share anything you know about this activity in the comments section below.

Illinois State Board of Education Student Advisory Council

The Illinois State Board of Education Student Advisory Council, or ISBE SAC, is a group of 16 high school students from across the state to bring student concerns to the attention of the State Board of Education. The ISBE SAC was established in 1975.

The ISBE SAC is meant to be a diverse group of students from across the state who have demonstrated a strong work ethic, the ability to think creatively and work well in groups. Membership is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors attending a public high school in Illinois.

The SAC members represent student concerns and can provide thoughts on ISBE’s existing and proposed programs, policies and regulations. The student members also choose a special project to research and present before the State Board of Education at the end of the school year.

Related Content

Elsewhere Online

Organization of Ontario Secondary Students

The Organization of Ontario Secondary Students, or OOSS, is a network of students who want to address education issues in Ontario and beyond.

Activities

The OOSS has one goal: to push students past what they thought was possible. We know there can be many hurdles ranging from school to finances with anything one does. We want to ensure that every student is successful in respect to their passion, be it science, business, social activism, athletics, sleeping, or anything else of their choosing.

Currently, OOSS is placing a special focus on reaching more schools across Ontario, strengthening the student-School board relation, improving organization and challenging ambassadors to take on more leadership opportunities within their region.

Related Pages

Offsite Info

California State Board of Education Student Member

The California State Board of Education Student Member has been a fixture since 1969. They have been full-voting members since 1983.

History

Starting in 1969, the SBE appointed a student to serve as a board advisor. In 1983, the Legislature and Governor granted the student full participation and voting rights.

Eligibility

In order to become student members of the SBE, students must be:

  • Any student enrolled in a California public high school who will be a senior in good standing
  • Be available to attend a statewide conference in November
  • Serve a one-year term from August through July
  • Attend all SBE meetings held during that time, which includes a minimum of two days every other month for approximately six meetings per year
  • Vote on educational policies vital to California’s students and schools

According to the State School Board of Education, the position provides a wonderful opportunity to influence educational policy in areas such as curriculum, standards, assessments, accountability, and Local Control Funding Formula.

Process

  • California law requires that school district governing board student members select six of the 12 semifinalists for further consideration by the SBE
  • The SBE uses the annual Student Advisory Board on Education, or SABE, conference to perform this function.
  • Twelve semifinalists must attend the Student Advisory Board on Education (SABE) Conference.
  • Semifinalists will participate in all SABE activities.
  • Semifinalists will make individual presentations to all other SABE participants about their interest in, and qualifications for, the student member position.
  • Following a secret ballot by the SABE participants, the names of six candidates will be submitted for further consideration by the SBE’s Screening Committee.
  • The decision of the SABE participants is final.
  • Each of the final six candidates will be interviewed by the SBE’s Screening Committee.
  • The Screening Committee will recommend three finalists to the SBE.
  • Following the Board’s action to select the three finalists, the names of the three finalists will be sent to the Governor.
  • The SBE’s recommendations to the Governor are final. Interviews and the selection of three finalists will occur before and at the SBE’s November meeting.
  • Representatives of the Governor will interview the three finalists, probably in the late spring or summer.
  • One of the finalists is be appointed by the Governor to be the Student Member.

 

Related Content

Offsite Info

Student Engagement Trust

The Student Engagement Trust, or SET,  works with primary and secondary schools, academy groups, and educational organisations in the UK and US to advance student engagement in school and learning.

Our work is based upon our Engagement Model, The Classroom Interaction Model of Student Engagement, and is grounded in research, personal beliefs, and years of professional experience, including teaching, school leadership, resource development, writing and publishing articles, presenting keynote addresses, and leading student leadership and staff professional development.

Offsite Link

Port Jervis School District

In 1972, students and adults in Port Jervis School District in Port Jervis, New York, worked together to redesign the district’s schools.

Activities

Working with teachers, administrators, parents, school board members and community organization leaders the student/adult gathering had 125 participants. They came up with a list of education reforms that included:

  • Making arrangements to distribute school newsletters in languages other than English
  • Planning a new community youth center
  • Starting a radio program produced by students
  • Setting up mentorships for young people with adults in the community
  • Arranging to make schools more available for community activities

Related Content

References

Montgomery County Student Alliance

The Montgomery County Student Alliance was a 1,000-member student-led education organizing group in Maryland in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Activities

Formed in early 1969, the Alliance worked to change schools, saying they “presently inhibit students’ individuality, creativity and independent thinking.” They published a report criticizing the school system as rigid and authoritarian and one that “didn’t encourage free inquiry or discussion.”

Alliance members met with employees of the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare in neighboring Washington, D.C. as well. That department was the predecessor of the U.S. Department of Education.

FBI

The FBI’s COINTELPRO program maintained informants in the Alliance and spied on students as young as 14. No reason for the FBI`s activities was located.

Related Articles

References

 

New York High School Student Union

The New York High School Student Union operated in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Activities

The NY Union worked with hundreds of students statewide to create a list of ten demands for schools.

  1. No suspensions, involuntary transfers, exclusion from classes, detention, harassment of students. Due process for students.
  2. No cops in schools, no narcos, security guards, plain clothesmen, informers.
  3. No program cards, hall checks, ID’s, passes.
  4. An end to commercial and general diplomas, one diploma for every student upon graduation.
  5. Open admissions to colleges, a college education free for everyone who wants one.
  6. Jobs and housing for every student who wants them on graduating, dropping out, or leaving home. The army is not a decent job.
  7. No military recruiting in schools, no military assemblies, literature, no sending names to draft boards or recruiters. An immediate end to the draft.
  8. Black and Latin departments controlled by Black and Latin students.
  9. Community control of the schools and every other community facility. Students are part of the community.
  10. POWER! Student control of curriculum, publications, assemblies, clubs, student government, dress, etc. The right to organize politically.
  11. We support the fifteen points of the Black and Puerto Rican Citywide HS Council.

Related topics

References

  • New York High School Free Press (an underground newspaper), No. 8, reprinted in Birmingham, J. (1970) Our Time Is Now: Notes from the High School Underground. New York: Praeger. p 178.

United States Office of Education Office of Students and Youth

The Office of Students and Youth is a former program of the United States Office of Education, now known as the United States Department of Education. Launched in 1969, the first leader of the office was Toby Moffet.

Activities

the office was created for several reasons:

  • To seek technical and financial assistance for innovative student-run programs
  • Keep USOE tuned in to students, and
  • Present a national overview of school tensions and ways of dealing with them
  • Run the Student Information Center in Washington, D.C., staffed mainly by local students, the center collects information on innovations in public high schools, especially those started by students; student rights; and participation in governance.

The Student Information Center also established a clearinghouse of information on secondary school issues, especially student-initiated reforms.

Related

Citations

  • Moffett, A.J., Jr. (May 1970) “Youth Gets a Voice in New Student Center,” Nation’s Schools, 85(5). pp. 57-59.