Here are facts about roles for students on school boards in North Carolina.

District School Boards

  • In 1972, the North Carolina state department of education reported that they encouraged local school boards to consider roles for students on school boards.
  • Today, students in North Carolina can join district school boards.

State Board of Education

  • Today, students in North Carolina can join the state school board.
  • Most districts select the class president at local high schools to serve as a representative on their district school board.
  • Students cannot vote on the state school board.
  • Most student representatives belong to advisory groups for school boards.
  • There are two student advisors to the North Carolina State Board of Education.
  • Students are selected by the Governor of North Carolina.
  • They are in either the 11th or 12th grade.
  • Students serve a two year term.
  • Students have been serving the state school board since 1986.
  • Law: According to the North Carolina General Statutes 115C-11, the governor of North Carolina is authorized to appoint “two high school students who are enrolled in the public schools of North Carolina as advisors to the State Board of Education.  The student advisors shall participate in State Board deliberations in an advisory capacity only.”
  • One 11thgrade student is appointed to the State Board each year, and serves a two-year term.
  • Students are eligible for appropriate state reimbursement.
  • The Governor of North Carolina accepts all nominations for the student advisory position, though there is no statewide effort to solicit nominees.
  • Generally, guidance counselors and principals contact the Governor’s Office with the names of students they would like to nominate.
  • The students are then required to submit a resume and character reference to the Governor’s Office.
  • The Governor of North Carolina appoints the student advisor to the State Board of Education.

North Carolina School Board Association

  • Students are not formal members of the state school board association
  • They do not receive specific training to support their involvement.
  • An ex-officio student representative has traveled to a state school board association meeting in the past.


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Published by Adam Fletcher

Adam is the founding director of SoundOut. An author, speaker and consultant, he has worked with K-12 schools, districts, nonprofits and others for more than 15 years. Learn more about him at http://soundout.org/Adam

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