Feature on Alison Cook-Sather

Alison Cook-Sather is a long-time writer, researcher and educator whose focus includes student voice, student participation and student engagement. SoundOut has followed her work since 2002, when her groundbreaking notion of authorizing students helped Adam Fletcher conceive of the Cycle of Engagement. Today, Alison is the Mary Katharine Woodworth Professor of Education and Director of the Peace, […]

Strategies for Meaningful Student Involvement

There are countless ways that students can be meaningfully involved throughout education. After our research and experience, we have found that most of these ways fall into one of six strategies. Following are those strategies. Each page includes an introduction, descriptions of the type, places where it happens, examples and resources. Strategies for Meaningful Student […]

Review: “Student Voice in School Reform” and “Opening the Floodgates”

Originally published in Meaningful Student Involvement Research Guide by Adam Fletcher (2004) Olympia, WA: SoundOut. “Student voice in school reform: Reframing student-teacher relationships” by D. Mitra. Published in 2003 in the McGill Journal of Education 38(2) pp 289-304, and “Opening the floodgates: Giving students a voice in school reform.” by D. Mitra. Published in 2001 in Forum […]

Review: “What Works in Education Reform: Putting Young People at the Center”

Originally published in Meaningful Student Involvement Research Review by Adam Fletcher (2004) Olympia, WA: SoundOut. “What Works in Education Reform: Putting Young People at the Center” by J. Tolman, P. Ford, and M. Irby. Published in 2003 in Baltimore, Maryland by International Youth Foundation. What Works is a comprehensive guide to student inclusive school change […]

Review: How to Improve Your School by Giving Pupils a Voice

Originally published in Meaningful Student Involvement Research Guide by Adam Fletcher (2004) Olympia, WA: SoundOut. Review of “How to Improve Your School: Giving Pupils a Voice” by J. Rudduck & J. Flutter. Published in 2004 by Continuum in New York and London. How to Improve Your School successfully argues that a range of circumstances necessitates that […]