SoundOut Schools

These are logos from SoundOut school clients and collaborators

These are K-12 schools, districts, state agencies and education nonprofits that have worked directly with SoundOut.


K-12 Schools

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These are some of the K-12 schools SoundOut has worked with since 2002.

Alberta

  1. Caroline High School, Caroline, Alberta, Canada
  2. Holy Redeemer Catholic High School
  3. St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Academy
  4. École St. Joseph School
  5. St. Mary of the Lake Catholic School
  6. École St. Mary School
  7. Vanier Community Catholic School

California

  1. Madrone High School, San Rafael, California (
  2. San Rafael High School, San Rafael, California
  3. Terra Linda High School, San Rafael, California
  4. Ahwanhee Middle School, California
  5. Alpha Tech Middle School, California
  6. Boron Jr./Sr. High School, California
  7. Brock Union Elementary School, California
  8. Christa McAuliffe Middle School, California
  9. Coalinga Middle School, California
  10. Coarsegold Elemtary School, California
  11. Colony Oak Elementary School, California
  12. Creekside Middle School, California
  13. Delta Island Elementary School, California
  14. Dunlap Elementary School, California
  15. Edison Computech, California
  16. El Capitan Middle School, California
  17. El Monte Jr. High School, California
  18. El Tejon School, California
  19. Foothill Farms Junior High School, California
  20. General Shafler Elementary School, California
  21. Haven Drive Middle School, California
  22. Henderson Community Day School, California
  23. Henderson Community Day School, California
  24. Island Elementary School, California
  25. Jack C. Desmond Middle School, California
  26. Jonas Salk Middle School, California
  27. Kastner Intermediate School, California
  28. Keyes Charter School, California
  29. Lake Don Pedro Elementary School, California
  30. Lakeside Elementary School, California
  31. Lee Middle School, California
  32. Liberty Middle School, California
  33. Lincoln Junior High School, California
  34. Livingston Middle School, California
  35. Raymond-Knowles Elementary School, California
  36. Reef Sunset Middle School, California
  37. Richland Junior High School, California
  38. Sherman Thomas Charter School, California
  39. Sonora Elementary School, California
  40. Summerville Elementary School, California
  41. Teel Middle School, California
  42. Thomas Jefferson Middle School, California
  43. Washington Intermediate School, California
  44. Wawona Middle School, California
  45. Earle E. Williams Middle School, California

Florida

  1. Cypress Creek Elementary School, Tampa, Florida
  2. Miami Senior High School, Miami, Florida
  3. Edison Senior High School, Miami, Florida
  4. Booker T. Washington Senior High School, Miami, Florida

Colorado

  1. Pinnacle Charter School, Denver, Colorado

Massachusetts

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  1. Community Academy of Science and Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  2. Engineering School, Boston, Massachusetts
  3. Monument High School, Boston, Massachusetts
  4. Social Justice Academy, Boston, Massachusetts

New York

  1. International School for Liberal Arts, Bronx, NYC, New York
  2. Lynch Middle School, Amsterdam, New York
  3. Monroe High School, Rochester, New York

Vermont

  1. Harwood High School, Moretown, Vermont
  2. Burlington High School, Burlington, Vermont
  3. Cabot High School, Cabot, Vermont
  4. Craftsbury High School, Craftsbury, Vermont
  5. Hazen Union High School, Hardwick, Vermont
  6. Mill River High School, Clarendon, Vermont
  7. People’s Academy, Morristown, Vermont
  8. Twinfield Union High School, Marshfield, Vermont

Washington

  1. Ridgeview Elementary School, Yakima, Washington
  2. Roosevelt High School, Seattle, Washington
  3. Secondary Academy for Success, Bothell, Washington
  4. Spanaway Elementary School, Spanaway, Washington
  5. Vashon Island Student Link Alternative School, Vashon, Washington
  6. White River High School, Buckley, Washington
  7. Wishkah Valley High School, Wishkah, Washington
  8. Black Hills High School, Tumwater, Washington
  9. Tacoma School of the Arts, Tacoma, Washington
  10. Odyssey — The Essential School at the Tyee Educational Complex, Seatac, Washington
  11. Dayton High School, Dayton, Washington
  12. Health Sciences and Human Services High School, Seatac, Washington
  13. Nathan Hale High School, Seattle, Washington
  14. Pateros High School, Pateros, Washington
  15. Toppenish High School, Toppenish, Washington
  16. South Ridge High School, Washington
  17. Omak High School, Omak, Washington
  18. Bethel School District, Spanaway, Washington
  19. Sumner School District, Sumner, Washington
  20. Cleveland High School, Seattle, Washington
  21. Colfax High School, Colfax, Washington
  22. Evergreen High School, Vancouver, Washington
  23. Franklin High School, Seattle, Washington
  24. Friday Harbor High School, Friday Harbor, Washington
  25. Harbor High School, Aberdeen, Washington
  26. Illahee Middle School, Federal Way, Washington
  27. Inchelium Middle and Senior High School, Inchelium, Washington
  28. Langley Middle School, Langley, Washington
  29. Lewis and Clark High School, Spokane, Washington
  30. Lewis and Clark Middle School, Yakima, Washington
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School Districts, Regional Support Agencies, and State Education Agencies

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These are some of the districts and government agencies SoundOut has partnered with since 2002.

  • Alberta Ministry of Education Student Engagement Office, Edmonton, Alberta
  • Living Waters Catholic Schools, Whitecourt, Alberta
  • Inchelium School District GearUP, Inchelium, Washington
  • Greater Amsterdam School District, Amsterdam, New York
  • Green River Educational Cooperative Kid Friendly Initiative, Kentucky
  • San Rafael School District, Marin, California
  • Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative Kid Friendly Initiative, Kentucky
  • Boston Public Schools Student Engagement Advisory Council, Boston, Massachusetts
  • New York State Student Support Services Center, LeRoy, New York
  • Oneida-Herkimer-Madison BOCES, New Hartford, New York
  • Onondaga-Cortland-Madison Counties BOCES Mid-State Student Support Services Center, Syracuse, New York
  • Oswego County BOCES, Mexico, New York
  • Genesee Valley BOCES Midwest Student Support Services Center, LeRoy, New York
  • Wayne Finger Lake BOCES, Newark, New York
  • Capital Region BOCES Eastern Region Student Support Services Center, Albany, New York
  • Ulster County BOCES New York Center for Student Safety, New Paltz, New York
  • Rochester City Schools, Rochester, New York
  • Hillsborough County Public Schools, Florida
  • Greater Amsterdam School District, Amsterdam, New York
  • New York State Education Department, Albany, New York
  • Puget Sound Educational Service District, Renton, Washington
  • Seattle Public Schools Office of Equity and Race Relations, Seattle, Washington
  • Seattle Public Schools Service Learning Seattle, Seattle, Washington
  • Seattle Public Schools Small Learning Environments Conference, Seattle, Washington
  • Seattle Public Schools Youth Engagement Zone, Seattle, Washington
  • Small Schools Project, Seattle, Washington
  • Yakima Public Schools, Yakima, Washington
  • Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board GearUP Program, Olympia, Washington
  • Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction 21st Century Community Learning Centers, Olympia, Washington
  • Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction Learn and Serve America Program, Olympia, Washington
  • Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction School Improvement Program, Olympia, Washington
  • Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction Title V and Innovative Programs, Olympia, Washington
  • State of Arizona Department of Education Coordinated School Health, Tucson, Arizona

Support Organizations

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These are some of the nonprofit organizations SoundOut has partnered with since 2002.

  • Center for Studies and Research in Education, Culture and Community Action (CENPEC), São Paulo, Brazil
  • Students Taking Charge, Skokie, Illinois
  • Suncoast EarthForce, Tampa, Florida
  • United States Department of Education, Washington, DC
  • University of Indianapolis Center for Excellence in Leadership of Learning, Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Vermont Principal’s Association, Montpelier, Vermont
  • Vermont State Department of Education HIV/AIDs Program, Montpelier, Vermont
  • Youth and Adults Transforming Schools Together (YATST), Hardwick, Vermont
  • Youth On Board/YouthBuild USA, Sommerville, Massachusetts
  • Washington State University Center for Bridging the Digital Divide, Pullman, Washington
  • Washington State Action For Healthy Kids, Skokie, Illinois
  • University of Washington College of Education, Seattle, Washington
  • University of Washington GEAR UP Program, Seattle, Washington
  • Academy for Educational Development, New York, New York
  • Carnegie Corporation, New York, New York
  • Action For Healthy Kids, Skokie, Illinois
  • Allegheny Partners for Out of School Time (APOST) Allegheny County United Way, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Arizona Dairy Council Fuel Up To Play 60, Tucson, Arizona
  • Catalyst Miami/Human Services Coalition of Miami-Dade County, Miami, Florida
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Division of Adolescent and School Health, Atlanta, Georgia
  • Community Schools Collaborative, Burien, Washington
  • Cloud Institute for Sustainability Education, New York, New York
  • College Success Foundation, Issaquah, Washington
  • Communities for Learning, Floral Park, New York
  • Connect Magazine, Sydney, Australia
  • Cross City Campaign for Urban School Reform, Houston, Texas
  • EarthForce, Denver, Colorado
  • Educational School District 123 21st Century Learning Centers, Pasco, Washington
  • Educational Service District 113, Tumwater, Washington
  • Educational Service District 112, Vancouver, Washington
  • Evergreen Public Schools, Vancouver, Washington
  • Generation YES, Olympia, Washington
  • Grantmaker’s Forum on Education, Washington, DC
  • Harvard University Graduate School on Education, Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Harwood Union School District, Moretown, Vermont
  • Institute for Democratic Education in America, Portland, Oregon
  • Learner-Centred Initiatives, Inc., Floral Park, New York
  • Living Waters School District, Whitecourt, Alberta
  • Marin County Department of Education, San Raphael, California
  • National PTA, Chicago, Illinois
  • Santa Barbara County Service Learning Initiative, Santa Barbara, California
  • Schenectady Public Schools, Schenectady, New York
  • Schools Out Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • ASCD Whole Child Initiative, Washington, DC
  • Road Map Project, Seattle, Washington
  • National School Board Association, Alexandria, VA
  • Alberta School Boards Association, Edmonton, Alberta
  • Washington State School Directors Association, Olympia, Washington
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Transforming Student Voice into Meaningful Student Involvement

Transforming Student Voice into Meaningful Student Involvement

Back in 2000, I was working as the first-ever student engagement specialist at the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. In the course of my work, I conducted a scan of activities across the United States, Canada and around the world through which students were improving schools. I found a lot of terms used frequently and interchangeably, like student empowerment and student leadership. I also found a few terms that weren’t talked about much that I wanted to explore.

One of those terms was student voice. Generally used as a synonym for student actions to change school or in curriculum as students sharing their experiences in class, this term fascinated me. Packed with potential, I read through the scant amounts of studies, articles and other literature available then and decided that the term was a cloak of sorts: Instead of being authentic, genuine or substantial, student voice was often slapped on any information adults were seeking and students were replying to.

I wanted to differentiate that types of student involvement. Talking with educators and students around Washington state, I found the phrase Meaningful Student Involvement to be useful, and ran with it.

Differences between issues

Adam Fletcher works with student leaders who are improving their schools in Arizona.
Adam Fletcher works with student leaders who are improving their schools in Arizona.

Student voice is any expression of any student, anywhere, at any time related to schools, learning and education. Meaningful Student Involvement is the process of engaging students as partners in every facet of school change for the purpose of strengthening their commitment to education, community, and democracy.

Student voice…

  • Doesn’t necessarily change education
  • Doesn’t require schools to change
  • Doesn’t require adults to change
  • Doesn’t require students to change

Meaningful Student Involvement…

  • Is systemwide action for school improvement
  • Fosters deep student/adult commitment
  • Requires whole school transformation
  • Supports deep learning by students and adults
  • Expands possibilities for students and adults

 

Students changing schools - A comparison of student voice and meaningful student involvement
This is a comparison of student voice and meaningful student involvement from Fletcher, A. (2017) Student Voice Revolution.

 

Surely these two areas overlap, and it can be said that student voice is a foundation of Meaningful Student Involvement. However, on its own, student voice doesn’t not require, obligate or otherwise compel schools to be difference. The research-driven Frameworks for Meaningful Student Involvement do require substance, purpose and outcomes beyond appearances.

Moving from here to there

Are you a K-12 school teacher who is interested in shifting their perspective from student voice to Meaningful Student Involvement? Maybe you’re a school leader, principal or headmaster who wants to engage students as partners in formal school improvement processes. Perhaps you work in a state or provincial education agency, or a local or regional school district. Are you a K-12 student who is ready for something more?

Elements to transformation

My work with more than 300+ K-12 schools in dozens of districts across the United States and around the world has led me to understand there are certain elements to transforming student voice into Meaningful Student Involvement. People in any role can build a team to move these elements into place. Here are what they look like.

 

These are SoundOut's elements of transforming student voice to meaningful student involvement.

 

  1. Assess. Look closely at what is currently happening in your location, whether a school, district or otherwise. Examine it for whether you’re listening to student voice, or fostering Meaningful Student Involvement, using our tools.
  2. Plan. Through deliberation, strategic action planning can transform schools. Overarching objectives, SMART goals, responsible partners and accountable student/adult partnerships have to be intact throughout. SoundOut’s planning tools allow educators and students to partner together while meeting real needs throughout their schools, districts and beyond.
  3. Educate. A lot of people assume that they will intuitively and inherently understand Meaningful Student Involvement, and that’s simply not true. You can’t make up the process; there is research that shows there are characteristics to adhere to.
  4. Systematize. Don’t try the scatterplot approach; instead, use the education system to structurally transform the roles of students throughout schools. Examine decision-making critically and purposeful challenge apathy.
  5. Support. Fostering Meaningful Student Involvement isn’t a one-time activity. Instead, it must be continuously sought-out, built, deconstructed, rebuilt and examined once more. Support must happen throughout every place Meaningful Student Involvement is intended to happen. There must be deliberately placed champions, succinctly enacted strategic plans, committed cultural and structural scaffolding, and authentic evaluations throughout.
  6. Celebrate. As students move closer to partnership with educators and further from being the consumers of schools, its essential to move their values to the forefront. One of these is celebration, which can allow adults in schools to lift up success, challenge being overwhelmed and support the ongoing evolution of schools. It can also let student creativity, enthusiasm and capacity for joy to come to the forefront, rescuing adults from our own cynicism.

After helping launch hundreds of Meaningful Student Involvement projects, these are the elements that have come clear to me as keys for transformation. What do you think matters most? I’d love to read your feedback in the comments below – please share!

 

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Meaningful Student Involvement Idea Guide

SoundOut Meaningful Student Involvement Idea Guide

(10 pgs, 2002-2015, FREE) Focusing on practical implementation of meaningful involvement, this brief guide is for students, teachers, principals and others who want something immediate and powerful to happen.

 


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Your FREE copies of the Meaningful Student Involvement series are online at soundout.org

Spectrum of Sustainability

This is the Spectrum of Sustainability by Adam Fletcher for SoundOut

Meaningful Student Involvement should be measured for its sustainability. The following is a tool I designed to measure sustainability in schools that I call the Spectrum of Sustainability. There are four primary ways student voice appears on this spectrum, and each is distinct.

  • ISOLATED: This means determining whether Meaningful Student Involvement is isolated as a one-time activity with low numbers of participants, singular focus of activity and few outcomes.
  • SPORADIC: Meaningful Student Involvement may be sporadic, with occasional opportunities, limited numbers and a limited scope of activity.
  • SUSTAINED: Meaningful Student Involvement could be sustained, with high infusion and every student in a school involved, with an unlimited scope of activity.
  • ESSENTIAL: Meaningful Student Involvement can also be determined to be essential, with the complete infusion of Student/Adult Partnerships throughout learning, relationships, procedures, policy and the culture of a school or education system.

Let me know what you think about the Spectrum of Sustainability. Where does YOUR school measure?

Related Articles

 

Student Voice Revolution: The Meaningful Student Involvement Handbook written by Adam Fletcher published by CommonAction Publishing in 2017.

Student Voice Revolution Continuum

This is the Student Voice Continuum by Adam Fletcher for SoundOut

When they are involved in ways that seek to be meaningful, it is important for students and adults to examine how their involvement happens. This is a tool designed to illustrate four different positions on the spectrum towards the Student Voice Revolution. Each position is fluid, and in some schools all four might exist at the same time.

  • ISOLATE: Schools should consider whether their activities isolate students by creating separate student involvement opportunities that are away from adults, without the context of learning, the education system, or school improvement.
  • INVOLVE: Another pattern that may occur is to involve students, where they are deliberately partners with adults throughout schools in specific opportunities.
  • INTEGRATE: Occasionally, schools might integrate students by deliberately partnering students with adults throughout learning, the education system, and school improvement.
  • INFUSION: Perhaps the pinnacle involvement happens when the education system works to infuse students, which means that Student/Adult Partnerships are inseparably entwined with the success of education systems and cannot be extracted without causing irreparable damage.

When you’ve used this tool, let me know what you think in the comments below!

 

Related Articles

 

Student Voice Revolution: The Meaningful Student Involvement Handbook written by Adam Fletcher published by CommonAction Publishing in 2017.